ISTE LITERACY PLN: 5 Point Friday

Recently, I joined the ISTE Literacy PLN leadership committee, a group of literacy educators with a variety of roles in education who convene around the shared of passion of technology shaping reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Every Friday, a member of the team writes and shares a “5 Point Friday” listical. Last week was my first submission and I wrote and shared resources for Media Literacy. Below is my post:

Technology has increased the consumption of information at a rate unseen before and only promises to grow in the future. On average, we spend over 6 hours online every day! As we flip between social media platforms and news sources, having the skills critically discern information is a necessity. Yet, little attention is given to the teaching of media literacy in schools. 

The spread of misinformation and disinformation is rampant. We can no longer rely on past methods, checklists, and resources to help us, and our students, navigate digital information, multi-modal modes, and deep fakes. Recognizing fact from fiction takes both human and machine learning, requiring educators to stay current in the resources available.  

Here are 5 digital resources for media literacy to consider:

  1. Games:  Which Face is Real? Learn how to distinguish between a real face and one computer-generated. Factitious – A Tinder-like game involving news instead of potential dates. Bad News – Places players in the role of the ones who create bad news to gain followers and fame. 
  2. Fact-Checking: Media Bias/Fact Check – MBFC is dedicated to educating the public on media bias and deceptive news practices. Snopes – started out as a site that checked urban legends but now encompasses general fact-checking of viral misinformation. Lead Stories – one of the longest-running, internet fact-checkers out there.
  3. Politics: Politifact – PolitiFact’s core principles, “independence, transparency, fairness, thorough reporting, and clear writing,” and if you are unfamiliar with the Truth-O-Meter, it is a must click link! Factcheck.org – is a nonpartisan, nonprofit “consumer advocate” for voters that aims to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics. AllSides – Interactive for users, AllSides exposes people to information and ideas from all sides of the political spectrum so they can better understand the world.
  4. Extensions: SurfSafe is a browser extension for Chrome with one goal, to detect fake or altered photos. NewsGuard is a browser extension to add to your Chrome or Edge browser which gives websites color-coded ratings based on their trust and accountability. Nobias alerts you to the political slant and credibility of news articles and authors before you even read them.
  5. Websites: KQED/PBS – provides a Media Literacy Educator Certification through Micro-credentials free for educators. NAMLE – The National Association for Media Literacy Education is a national organization dedicated to media literacy providing resources for educators. News Literacy Project – excellent resource to teach students how to know what to believe in the digital age. 

Finally, and probably the source I call upon the most, a creative commons ebook by Mike Caulfield, Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers. It is time to toss out the CRAAP checklist and replace it with the methods and moves he shares to best equip our students with the skills needed for contemporary discourse!

Are you a member of ISTE? Consider joining the Literacy PLN to get updates, resources, and connections to other EdTech Literacy Fanatics!

ISTE Ignite::: Flat Earth, 9/11, Anti-Vax: Things People Doubt in the Digital Age of Information

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Photo Credit: Shawn McCusker, Thank you, friend!

This year, I pushed my comfort level and gave an Ignite (5 mins. 20 slides) at ISTE in Chicago. It was my first time presenting in this format and I chose to speak about a topic that I am passionate about – How to Develop Healthy Skepticism and Fact-Checking in Students.

I started off with a personal story from college about a girl on my floor who was sucked into a cult…

Armed with flyers and a headful of answers, Cassandra pushed her way into our room and began her recruitment speech.

The misinformation of today is more difficult to recognize, posing as websites and Facebook pages. As educators, it is our obligation recognize that the checklists we once used to verify information have a hard time exposing the fake news, half-truths, media-bias, propaganda, fallacies… that we consume on a daily basis.

Critical literacy skills are needed not only for current discourse but also rhetoric in modes we haven’t even considered taking, for instance, Deep Fakes. Fueled by AI, creators are enabled to hijack one’s identity, voice, face, body. Think of it like photoshop on steroids but also with video, and now audio. What was easily recognizable as altered has become so sophisticated that it is almost imperceptible to detect by both human or computer.

We must recognize the shifts in information and change to adapt to the new mediums, equip students with critical thinking skills that allow them to get closer to the truth than they once were. To move beyond checklists I suggest looking into the work of Michael Caufield who provides guidance with 4 Moves for digital information.

Verification is a process, not a simple yes or no. You may ask if it is worth it? Or why doesn’t the government step in and take down these websites? On a surface level, that may seem easiest, but upon further reflection, once one allows censorship to invade their space it creeps into every aspect of their life.

The answer is not censorship but empowerment. And when our students walk out that door for the last time, I hope they leave with a critical lens to consume information. Equipped with the ability to not only think critically but speak with authority and be advocates for themselves and others in the great unknowns of the world.

Thank you to all of the people that supported me during this process and cheered me on as I took the stage! Steven Anderson, Adam Bellow, and Erin Olson

Until next year!!!

Thank you to Dan Kreiness for recording Round 2 #Ignites. If you would like to see my whole presentation click the link!  Shaelynn’s Ignite

On mobile device? Try this link at 47 mins. Round 2 all Ignites

Everything You Wanted to Know About Formative Assessment But Were Afraid to Ask…

Recently Steven Anderson and I had an engaging discussion on the topic of Formative Assessment for ACER Education. Check out what we had to say.


Some of the highlights:

What Is Formative Assessment—As you can tell from our video, there are many ways to describe formative assessment. Simply put, Formative Assessment is taking a pause in learning to ensure students are where they need to be for a particular lesson. The best formative assessments are subtle, giving teachers an overall picture of how students are learning and adapting to their immediate needs. Think of it as a GPS for the teacher—knowing where students are in their learning and where you should head in your teaching.

Formative Assessment could also look like “check-in” questions at the end of a lesson or class, offering valuable information on which direction to head next. Formative Assessments should not be graded assessments. At the end of the day, the goal is to get a pulse on what students know and how effectively the teacher is teaching the material.

But Why Formative Assessment-From the ASCD Book Formative Assessment Strategies for Every Classroom: An ASCD Action Tool, 2nd Edition, Susan Brookhart explains that:

Formative Assessment refers to the ongoing process students and teachers engage in when they:
● Focus on learning goals.
● Take stock of where current work is in relation to the goal.
● Take action to move closer to the goal.

Students and teachers who are engaged in the Formative Assessment process are constantly examining how teaching and learning work as one If we look at Hattie’s Effect Size, or practices that best move student learning forward, Providing Feedback, Providing Formative Evaluation, and Self-Questioning had anywhere from a 0.64 to 0.68 effect size. What do these results show us? These studies show us that students and teachers who engage in the Formative Assessment process learn and retain more information compared to take-home homework.

Low-Tech Formative Assessment- Technology can make the collection of data related to Formative Assessment easier, but it’s not necessary. We’ve seen a variety of different low-tech ways to gauge student understanding. From dry erase boards where students can write the answer to a question, to sticky notes exercises that can act as an open-forum, Formative Assessment does not require a large investment to make a large impact.

Is There Hardware Designed For Formative Assessment? In fact, there is. Shaelynn and I are partnering with ACER Education to take a look at their new TravelMate Spin B118. It’s a dynamic, classroom-specific device that was built with Formative Assessment in mind. It comes with their ACER TeachSmart software that makes use of LED lights built into the lid of the device. This allows the teacher to ask Formative Assessment questions in the middle of a lesson and students can change their lights simply and easily. The lights could stand for anything—ABCD, Yes/No, I’ve got it/I don’t understand.

The TravelMate Spin B118 is also equipped with a digital pen and Windows Ink that allows users to sketch, map, annotate, and draw with the ease of a traditional pen and the magic of digital ink. The visual aspect of this tool is not only beneficial for teachers to model skills to students, but students are able to brainstorm, ideate, and prototype during the design process, making this an invaluable tool in the classroom.

Our Favorite Apps and Tools For Formative Assessment We’ve talked about how Formative Assessment can be done without tech. However, when we add that layer into our teaching and learning, we can do so much more. There are many (free!) apps and tools out there that achieve this.

Nearpod— Create lessons and sync them across devices in the classroom, with built-in tools for questioning, drawing, audio and video responses.
RecapApp— One of our favorite tools built for Formative Assessment. Available on any device, students can record their thoughts and feelings on any given lesson. There’s also a questions tool where feedback can be posted.
EdPuzzle— Add an interactive layer to YouTube videos. Teachers can build in short questions at various points in the video to ensure students are getting what they need out of it. This is also great for data collection and seeing how students’ progress over time.
Flipgrid— A very cool way to post video questions and gather responses. Videos can be shared so students can see where their peers are in their learning as well.
Padlet—A virtual board for multimodal sticky notes. Great for tickets out the door or reflection activities.

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7 Virtues of a Blended Learning Teacher

Adobe Spark (17)This blog post is part of the CM Rubin World Global Search for Education which poses a question each month to leading educators for reflection and sharing. This month’s question is “To what extent is this a new model of learning in a digital age? Is blended learning becoming yet another overhyped myth?  What lessons learned can you share from your own school community?”

Blended learning is a disputed term among academics and one may find what it is NOT, rather than what it IS. In 2009, I entered the world of blended learning after the school I taught at implemented a 1 to 1 laptop initiative which placed computers in the hands of all students (grade 6-12) that they used in the classroom and brought home with them each night. Because of this experience and through conversations I have had with other educators in similar education ecosystems, I believe that blended learning is a combination of traditional teaching methods and digital ones, this in different languanges.

Educators who are sound in content and pedagogy are often high-impact blended learning teachers as well. Through reflection and conversation, blended learning teachers possess similar virtues:

Teacher Virtues:  

  1. Uninhibited Creativity in delivery and content of learning
  2. Sees Failure as Opportunities for Growth and gains achieved through perseverance
  3. Seeks out Opportunities for Improvement
  4. Reflective in Practice and on student achievement
  5. Student-centered and Relinquishes Control of elements in traditional teaching
  6. Sees Technological Differentiation as a Way to Meet All Students’ Needs
  7. Recognizes Multidimensional and Multimodal Learning as Relevant and Engaging

Teacher virtues in both a traditional or blended environment extend across both and most, are interchangeable in either environment. Technology or blended learning does not automatically make one better. In fact, through experience, it does quite the opposite, magnifying poor classroom management or lack of understanding of content or pedagogy. Effective blended teachers are always effective classroom teachers but the opposite may not be true. To be a high-impact blended teacher it takes creativity, understanding, resourcefulness, and reflection in a digital learning space.

7 Alternatives to Traditional Vocabulary Tests

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It is through vocabulary that information is accessed and content learned. There is no disagreement in the importance of a robust vocabulary for all students; it allows them to comprehend more of what they read and write better. But the way we review and test vocabulary is often very painful, and it doesn’t have to be. So toss aside your fill-in-the-blank tests and multiple choice bubble sheets and try one of these out before the end of the year.

7 Alternatives to the Traditional Vocabulary Test

  1. Name That Vocab. Tune – Students love music, in fact, I bet most kids under 18 have earbuds in right now and are jamming out to their favorite tunes as they are studying. Why not amplify this love of music on a vocabulary review or assessment. “Name That Vocab. Tune” has students create a catchy title for a song using the word given. To further demonstrate understanding, students explain and justify their song title and how the vocabulary word fits their thinking.
Word Song Title Justification
Juxtapose Black Juxtaposition of Our Hearts When you really love someone and they have no interest in you at all then your heart would be red but their heart would be black and by placing them side by side …

2. Sketch Vocabulary – Sketch vocabulary is an activity that allows students to use their creative side to illustrate the meaning of vocabulary words. This strategy can be both low-tech with paper, pencils, and markers; or high-tech using apps like Procreate , Paper 53 , or even the new drawing function with Google Keep (perfect for Chromebooks).

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3. SAN – SANs strategy has students identify a word that is the synonym, the antonym or no relation at all to the vocabulary term listed. It not only forces their brain to think of the word differently but also increases their vocabulary by flooding their brain with different options.

Example   Disruptive

  • Clumsy (N)
  • Calm (A)
  • Troublesome (S)

4. How Does it Relate? – This strategy has students call upon prior learning during the test. Have students list and make associations to previous words learned and listed on the word wall in the classroom. Answering the prompt, what is the connection?, further demands deep thinking while students are wrestling with essential vocabulary.

5. Skit or Dialogue – Using the vocabulary words, students can write a short skit or lines of dialogue individually or with a partner or small group. When finished, perform their scripts to each other or a wider audience. Or take their writing online and have them create comics. A few of my favorite resources to explore, Storyboard That (Chromebook) and BookCreator.

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6. 1 of 2 – This strategy has the students considering 2 sentences and identify which one uses the vocabulary word correctly. This is great when working on words with multiple meanings or focusing on a specific morpheme.

7. Tableau – Finally, a tableau is a group of models or motionless figures that represent a scene. In this case, students are given a vocabulary word and have 3 minutes to brainstorm their tableau that demonstrates the meaning of the word for the class. This fun activity has students collaborating and up and moving.  

Edtech Bonus for Vocabulary:

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