How to Create a Google My Maps Challenge

Social Media Challenge

During a session at ISTE17, Steven Anderson and I created an interactive, group challenge to kick it off. We had educators assemble into teams, pick a team name, and gave them a link to a Google My Maps. The link took the teams to a location where they learned about a social media platform, had a task to complete, submitted their answers, and then raced off to the next location.

It was engaging, collaborative, and a competition which helped to energize the educators on the last day of the conference. As promised, I created a template and step by step directions for all those wanting to recreate their own Google My Maps Challenge. I encourage you to use both resources and make a copy for yourself to use and share.

I was introduced to this concept at the Google Innovator Academy and fell in love with the idea of using this type of challenge with educators and students. I have created these types of interactive activities for many different learning objectives (cross-discipline literacy to learning Google Suite Tools). I also believe that modeling this activity provides other educators with inspiration to try something different in their own classroom and consider the use of technology to differentiate in the classroom meeting the needs of all students. 

Thanks to all that attending our session and loved this activity! Hope this post helps and reach out if you need more assistance! Steven and Shaelynn’s Session Resources found here: Snapping, Gramming, and Scoping Your Way to Engagement

Technoliteracies: Sharing the Top Digital Resources to Support Student Readers and Writers

technoliteracies

Last year, my best friend Erin Olson and I started an Instagram account to share our love of literacy and technology. Technoloiteracies was born as a place where we could share the best resources, apps, and technology to support student readers and writers.

Instagram is a perfect platform to share resources and connect with other educators. Instagram is an example of microblogging; the sharing of short and frequent posts which made it ideal for us. Erin and I typically share resources a couple times a week. The resources and apps we share span the grades (K-12), cross platforms and devices, and focus on all things literacy. So if you are on Instagram, check us out!

 

Technoliteracies Top 9 Posts of 2016

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  1. Hypothes.isOpen annotation on the web. Hypothes.is allows users to highlight and annotate web pages. Converse over the world’s knowledge and share to public, group, or keep private! Also available as a Chrome extension. Great to support student thinking, research & curation.
  2. Pics4Learning Pics4Learning is a perfect resource to share with students and educators. Here, you will find images to use in all things for school and it’s safe search helps to keep it appropriate for all learners. From multimedia creations to digital portfolios, these copyright-friendly images are perfect and support student understanding in terms of image use and citations. As a bonus, you can also add to the growing collection by uploading your own images to share.
  3. PrismaPrisma is an incredible photo editing app which transforms images into works of art based on the styles of famous artists and periods. Share with students for use in multimedia projects and great for digital storytelling.
  4. 100 Word Challenge – 100 Word Challenge is an online resource which provides a weekly creative writing challenge for kids under 16. Prompts are posted and the community of writers made up of students and educators post and comment on student writing. Anyone can join and share their succinct writing to a global audience. Great to get students writing for real.
  5. Elink.io – Check out elink.io as a perfect tool to collect, curate, & share webpages. Perfect for newsletters sharing student creations or webpages of resources to launch kids into a new unit. Simple, easy, and free. Also available as a chrome extension.
  6. ThingLink – ThingLink provides users with an interactive and engaging platform, great for inquiry. Multiple student and teacher uses by linking and sharing content. Now, ThingLink offers a 360 picture view. Checkout out Thinglink.com for interactive images and videos! Easily create a collection of resources for students.
  7. Bubbl.us – Check out bubbl.us. A brainstorming tool perfect for students to organize thoughts and make their thinking visible. Color code topics, modify and move bubbles with a click, and share with peers for collaborative work.
  8. Dipity – An interactive timeline that has unfortunately shut down. Try TimeToast as an alternative.
  9. Read The World – Readtheworld.org is a site that helps you diversify your literature selections. It is an archived hand-picked book site which is divided by country, region, and state. Each title has a brief summary, quotes, length, and brief author bio.

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Erin and I wish you all a Happy and Healthy 2017!

 

5 Ways to Kick-Start “Back to School” Using Social Media in the Classroom

Fotor

5 Ways to Kick-Start “Back to School” Using Social Media in the Classroom

1. Instagram – A traditional activity to help students build relationships with each other and the teacher is an “About Me” poster. Why not use the popular social media platform, Instagram, instead, we know a lot of our students buy active instagram followers so their posts are probably going to go viral. Using a class hashtag, students can tag posted pictures, sharing everything from their favorite spot to read in the school to an important person in their life. Not only would this be a collective space to grow relationships, but during the in-class sharing, students could refine communication and storytelling skills.

2. Voxer – This trendy, new social media platform allows voxers to continue the conversation through various modes including text, voice, and pictures via a threaded discussion. Students could share goals with each other, provide advice to underclassmen, or answer questions posed by new students or visitors. This versatile platform makes collaboration a snap; easily pass pictures, ideas, or voice comments to group-mates.

3. Twitter – Twitter is quickly becoming the new “Facebook” for people under 21 (mostly because their parents aren’t on it yet). Teachers can model advantages of connectivity by tweeting with a “Sister School”. Succinct writing opportunities to share a glimpse into the “life” of a typical teen in their demographic area provides a lens to students unmatched through vicarious means. Multiple perspectives of current events and issues, connecting to experts, networking, and building a positive, on-line presence are all possible in 140 characters.

4. Facebook – Personal triumphs, recognizing good deeds, daily gratitude to those who helped you survive another school day; all of these posts on a School’s Facebook Page which is designated to share the unrecognized “Good” that takes place daily in the halls of our schools, can be achieved through Facebook.  Submissions can remain anonymous, and messages approved and posted by a small group of students. When ownership is placed back into the hands of  students, their contributions become a recognizable part of the positive culture!

5. Remind – A safe and free way to text students, athletes, and parents. The cellphone: the first thing a students checks when they wake and the last thing looked at before bed. Creating groups in Remind early in the school year, as a communication tool, saves time and guarantees that everyone receives the same message. From an athletic team, a school club, or even classroom assignments, Remind allows teachers to text important news and reminders that will reach students and parents alike.

Best of Luck in the 2014-2015 School Year!