9 Google Resources to Support Reading

 

 

Google Read

The doubling of knowledge will happen every twelve hours, according to IBM, because of the “internet of things” and the ease in which we have the capacity to publish and share. With this dynamic pool of information available to students, it is essential to equip them with skills necessary to locate reliable and relevant information. Over the past two years, I have collected digital resources, apps, and extensions that will assist educators in this endeavor, as well as in the areas of inquiry, writing, and multimodal creations (all will be subsequent posts).

The following are 9 of my favorite Google resources to support reading (**Bonus 3 at the end):

  1. Google Cultural Institute – Google Cultural Institute makes the “world’s culture accessible anyone, anywhere.” Students can explore collections and exhibits from around the world.
  2. Google Trends – Google Trends helps users explore the world’s information through the data it generates. Search trends, YouTube views, to patterns found in correlating terms and topics are all available for analysis.
  3. Google Scholar – Google Scholar helps students find relevant and reliable scholarly literature. Search across disciplines, types, and research to access peer-reviewed sources. Add to your personal library and automatically cite information correctly.
  4. Google Books – Google Books works just like a search engine. Search by topic, grade level, and even author. Download and read books on any device. Google Books also allows users to upload their own documents, bookmark while reading and add to their personal library.
  5. Newsela – Newsela is a unique way to increase reading comprehension by providing student access to nonfiction news. Every article has 5 levels, allowing readers to access the same information at their independent reading level. Access to Common-Core aligned quizzes follow the articles, allowing comprehension learning targets to be met with confidence.
  6. Google Primary Sources – Google Primary Sources is a custom search engine which allows users to search thousands of primary sources. Search by topic, date, name, etc. to locate primary sources.
  7. Read & Write for Google – Read & Write for Google is a Chrome app which supports reading, writing, and research. Select text to be read aloud, define highlighted words, and translate text into other languages, and summarize text on web page.
  8. Google Similar Pages – Google Similar Pages is a Chrome app that helps students locate additional web pages similar to the ones the have found valuable. Accessing additional information and sources aligned with previous sources.
  9. Google News – Google News is a personalized news site aggregated with headlines from news from around the world. This comprehensive source customizes information according to reader’s preferences and offers diversity from around the globe.

3 Bonus Resources for our younger readers. Kid-friendly search engines, perfect for elementary students!

  1. Kidrex
  2. GoGooglians
  3. Kidz Search

 

 

5 Chrome Apps/Extensions Literacy Teachers Need to Add Now!

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A common question I receive from literacy teachers is what apps and extensions I have added to my Chrome browser. While my list is extensive, I have chosen 5 apps and extensions that I feel literacy teachers should consider adding to their own browser. First, let me simplify the difference between an app and extension.

Extension – Extends your web browser improving functionality. The icon for your extensions on located on the top, right side of the web browser.

App – An app, added to your chrome browser, acts as a portal to transport you to a different interface than you are currently on.

  1. Nearpod -Nearpod is a classroom tool that allows interations and assessment options. Nearpod is a Chrome App that engages students and is device-friendly. I also like the multiple question/response options provided. From an open-ended response option to a drawing one, using your trackpad or touch-screen, Nearpod is an essential to explore!
  2. Snagit – Snagit is a Chrome extension by TechSmith. Use Snagit to caputre your screen. Grab an image from your screen, record a video of your screen and share seemlessly, or create a GIF from a short video. Snagit would be great for annotations, demonstrations, and can easily be shared with others, making it perfect for collaboration.
  3. Padlet – Padlet extension allows you to post the link to any  webpage to a previously created “wall”. This extension would be a quick way to share resouces with students, or could be used collaboratively to support small group work.
  4. Newsela – Newsela is a Chrome app.
    Newsela publishes daily new articles that are leveled to support readers needing the same content but are at different reading levels. Newsela also provides core alignment and a set of comprehension questions for students utilize.
  5. Easybib – The world’s largest citation machine. Click the extension to cite the webpage, apply specific formatting, recieve information on the credibility of the website. The amount of digital information available online magnifies the need to model to our students the reliability, relevance, and citation information of online sources.

These 5 apps and extensions are useful additions for any educator to add to their browser. Each, when applied and aligned to specific learning targets, support readers and writers. What favorites would you add to this list?

Digital News Sources for Students: A Companion to Investigative Journalism

Have I mentioned how much I love my job? This summer I had the opportunity to attend the Teacher’s College Summer Writing Institute in New York. Along with honing my craft, I had an opportunity to connect and converse with Cornelius Minor. (and although he compared our love of literacy and technology equaling a comparative job/education role, he is much, much smarter than I am and works at a Global level,,, but more about that in a later post)

Part of my duties this year include “coaching” (I use the term coaching loosely because I learn far more collaborating and reflecting with these 2 educators; Jen Paulsen and Megann Tresemer,  than I would solo) two 8th grade teachers that are implementing Lucy Calkins, Writing Workshop Units of Study. Currently, the students are writing as investigative journalists.

As the first sentence in this Unit of Study states, “Journalism is the literature of Democracy” (Mary Ehrenworth and Cornelius Minor). Investigative Journalism blends informative writing with narrative writing providing precise details and intentional narrative techniques. Students learn about the 5Ws found in Investigative Journalism (Who, What, When, Where, Why) refine skills in observations, details and craft, write their own pieces and push themselves to be better writers through the aide of mentor texts, instruction, and individual conferences with an expert teacher.

Today, after the weekly observation and reflective conversation, Megann and I were discussing the types of news sources current day students and adults read regularly. While we both acknowledge the role and preference of traditional print sources in many people’s lives. Megann and Jen work in a middle school which implemented a 1 to 1 educational environment this year, meaning that they gave every student a Chromebook to use in school and bring home with them every night. (So, with my 6 years experience of teaching in a 1 to 1 setting I was a perfect fit for this district).

Our conversation spurred a retrieval of digital  “News Sources” I have collected throughout the years providing a starting place for Megann and hopefully an addition to your own collection.

1. Newsela – A nonfiction site that is updated daily for with real-world news and differentiated by reading level. Students can become part of the global conversation!

2. Flocabulary Week In Rap – Fostering a love of learning in a mode that students love! Videos and Hip Hop keep students informed.

3. Kicker – Getting up to speed quickly and easily with the current happenings of the world. Accessibility for all readers on top stories!

4. 10 X 10 – Shared to me by my friend Erin Olson, 10X10 appeals to the visual learner. It is described as “an interactive exploration of the words and pictures that define the time.”

5. New York Times Learning Network Blog – A place for students and teachers to read, write, collaborate and share based off of the content in the New York Times!

Finally, don’t forget to collect and share student writing examples as well. Megann directed me to the high school’s online News Source called Tiger Hi-Line, a perfect, local example to inspire her middle schools students!