25 Online Poetry Resources

I love teaching poetry. There is something beautiful about the structure and the word choice that portray the exact image and message the poet intended. From Sonnets to Blackout Poetry, having students read, write, and recite poetry allows them to see how to bend language in a playful way to communicate sarcasm or notice the enjambment of words to communicate “this should be read rapidly”.

Poetry is closely tied to music, and it is through music that I often hooked students into considering the magic of poetry. In fact, one of the activities I had them do was locate poetry devices in song lyrics (You can see an example here ). This activity launched them into reading & analyzing, writing, and reciting poetry.

Poetry does not have to be intimidating to students or adults. Connections can be made to music, real life, and social justice. Helping students unlock the mystery of poetry can be as simple as summarizing lines or stanzas, identifying speaker, setting, and situation, and reaffirming that while we may not know the exact intentions of the poet, there are ideas and understandings that are more correct than other ideas.

As April quickly approaches, and many will be celebrating National Poetry Month, I have created a list of some of my favorite poetry websites, resources, and apps to support teachers as they navigate the poetic sea – Enjoy!

Traditional Poetry Websites

  • The Poetry Foundation – is an independent literary organization committed to a vigorous presence for poetry in our culture. It exists to discover and celebrate the best poetry and to place it before the largest possible audience. It works to raise poetry to a more visible and influential position in our culture. Multiple pages are connected to this website and it is a great place to start.
  • Poetry 180 – Poetry 180 resides on the Library of Congress website. It is designed to make it easy for students to hear or read a poem on each of the 180 days of the school year. Hosted by former Poet Laureate, Billy Collins, a perfect way to incorporate poetry daily into your classroom.
  • Poets.org – Poets.org is produced by the Academy of American Poets. The site was launched in 1996, becoming the original online resource for poems, poets’ biographies, essays about poetry, and resources for K-12 teachers.
  • Library of Congress Poet Laureate – The Library of Congress Poet Laureate website also resides on the Library of Congress website. Students are able to learn about the position of US Poet Laureate, about the current Poet Laureate, and their projects.
  • NCTE Poetry – NCTE Poetry Resources – The National Council of Teachers of English has multiple resources for teachers who want to use poetry in their classroom. Included are interviews with Poets, books to consider adding to your collections, as well as lessons to use with students.

Nontraditional Poetry Websites

  • Split This Rock – Explores and celebrates the many ways that poetry can act as an agent for change: reaching across differences, considering personal and social responsibility, asserting the centrality of the right to free speech, bearing witness to the diversity and complexity of human experience through language, imagining a better world.
  • Power Poetry – Power Poetry promotes a safe space where poets can share their work, as well as encouraging more growth in the organization. Power Poetry is the world’s first and largest mobile poetry community for youth. It is a one-of-a-kind place where you can be heard. “Power Poetry isn’t just about poetry: it’s about finding your voice and using it to change the world!”
  • Song Meanings – In the larger tradition of poetry, there is a strong relationship to music, instrumentation, and oral culture. Textuality, bookishness, I would argue, is the reason why contemporary poets have not been able to ignite a larger following and perception of poetry. Delve into the lyrics, text, and meanings of your favorite songs and learn how poets can SING better.
  • Teen Ink – National teen magazine and website devoted to helping teens share their own voices while developing reading, writing, creative and critical-thinking skills.
  • Poetry Out Loud – Poetry Out Loud encourages students to learn about great poetry through memorization and recitation. This program helps students master public speaking skills, build self-confidence, and learn about literary history and contemporary life.
  • Poetry4Kids – The funny poetry playground of children’s author Kenn Nesbitt. You will find lots of funny poems and poetry books for children, classic children’s poetry, games, poetry lessons, and activities, plus a rhyming dictionary, videos, school visit information and lots more.
  • Poetry in America – Poetry in America, created and directed by Harvard professor Elisa New, is a new public television series and multi-platform digital initiative that brings poetry into classrooms and living rooms around the world.
  • Google Arts and Culture – Explore collections and exhibits all about Poets and Poetry on the Google Arts and Culture website. Google Arts and Culture allows students to explore collections from around the world – a perfect primary source.
  • Glossary of Poetry Terms – A website that is part of the Poetry Foundation and is a comprehensive glossary of poetic terms, theories, and schools of poetry. A perfect Reference tool for all your budding Poets.

National Poetry Month Resources

  • National Poetry Month – National Poetry Month each April is the largest literary celebration in the world, with tens of millions of readers, students, K-12 teachers, librarians, booksellers, literary events curators, publishers, bloggers, and, of course, poets marking poetry’s important place in our culture and our lives.
  • Dear Poet Project – a multimedia education project inviting young people in grades five through twelve to write letters in response to poems written and read by some of the award-winning poets
  • Poem in Your Pocket – April 18th is Poem in Your Pocket Day, part of National Poetry Month. Share your poem with everyone you meet. During the day, carry it with you, and share it with others at schools, bookstores, libraries, parks, workplaces, street corners, and on social media using the hashtag #pocketpoem

Unique Poetry Resources and Apps

  • Bot or Not – When AI (Artificial Intelligence) meets poetry you have Bot or Not. A fun game that tests your identification skills to decide if the poem in question was written by a human or by a computer.
  • Poetry Machine – Students can create an original poem on this website using one of the 48 templates listed. Everything from acrostic and haikus to animal poems; there is something for all young poets.
  • Instant Poetry 2 – Poetry 2 is an iOS app the reminds me of magnetic poetry. Create your own poem with images and drag and drop words. Upload your own image to use, or refresh to get a list of new words. Write and share poetry with anyone! 
  • Rhyme Zone – A website that allows students to search for rhymes, synonyms, and definitions. Perfect for poetry and writing lyrics.
  • Poemix – Remix text into simple poetry. Source of text can be anything from your favorite book to tweets. Fun and simple to use.
  • Mesostic Poem Generator – Type in your name and a short bio and this program will create a mesostic poem for you. It is similar to an acrostic, but with the vertical phrase intersecting the middle of the line, as opposed to beginning each new line.
  • Poem Generator – Poem Generator allows students to choose the structure, enter words based on prompts and parts of speech and the website does the rest. With 14 structures to choose from, students can have fun exploring and writing.
  • Blackout Bard – Blackout Bard is a free mobile app that parallels blackout poetry in a digital form. Students can choose a block of text, blackout words, and style the remaining ones to create and share a poem.
  • Facing History and Ourselves – Facing History and Ourselves Poetry Section can help students explore and connect with issues of identity, group membership, and belonging, as well as provide models and inspiration for how they might tell their own stories.

Have I forgot to list any of your favorite resources, websites, apps for Poetry? Be sure to comment below and remember to share your National Poetry Activities that your students are doing this year.

A Writing Activity: New Year, Dream Big!

New Year, Dream Big ...Very soon, many of us will return back to school and greet the smiling faces of our students whom we have not seen since 2018. Granted, the time spent apart is much shorter than a summer break, but brings with it an important sign of starting fresh.

It’s the beginning of a new year; 365 opportunities to dream big and accomplish something new (or something that has been an unreachable goal until this year). For many students, it will be a time to reconnect with friends and teachers that they haven’t seen for a couple weeks. Some students are beginning new coursework, attending a new school, or even planning for graduation in a few months.

As a teacher, it was always my favorite time to have students write. Write about their dreams, goals, and ambitions, plus, it went perfectly with the start of a new year. Creative titles have always alluded me, so I simply called this New Year, Dream Big.

Students (and me, I always modeled and shared my writing with students) used the following questions to help spur their writing:

New Year, Dream Big…

  1. What are my dreams? In school? Life? Friendship? Activities? Etc. (Identify one to write about)
  2. Why is this dream important to me? Why did I choose this one?
  3. Is this a new dream? Old dream? Habitual dream?
  4. What do I already know or understand about this dream?
  5. What steps do I need to take to make this happen? Have I already completed or started any of these steps?
  6. What help do I need to achieve this dream? Who or what can help me?
  7. What is my timeframe for accomplishing this dream? How will I know I succeeded? When will it be time to give up?
  8. Closing thoughts and reflections?

 

At times, these pieces appeared on student blogs or influenced other writing done throughout the semester. Students were proud of their Dreams and shared them with everyone who would listen. And I was proud of them.

So consider having your students write to start off the New Year. Help them vocalize their dreams and make them a reality!

 

Hat-Tip to Regie Routman and Kelly Gallagher for providing inspiration for this work.

The Handmaid’s Tale, Censorship, & Banned Books

Adobe Spark (19)

Last week, I began watching The Handmaid’s Tale, a Hulu original series based off of the novel by Margaret Atwood. Set in a dystopian society and ruled by an extreme, fundamentalist regime; the series draws viewers in with multiple storylines, dynamic characters, and pendulum swings oscillating between hope and despair. Along with the brutal objectification of females in this radical, religious Totalitarian society, The Handmaid’s Tale, sheds light on the power of the literate individual.

Books, reading, and writing are outlawed in Gilead, and one scene in an early episode where “The Eyes” are burning books and art, immediately reminded me of other stories about censorship and book banning, such as Fahrenheit 451. The ability to read, write, and think for oneself is seen as a threat to the new government of Gilead and there is not a more powerful illustration of this than in the “Closet Scene”  from episode 4. Offred, the main character, was locked in her room for 2 weeks straight and finds a Latin phrase, Nolite Te Bastardes Carborundorum, carved into the corner of her closet. This single phrase, written by her predecessor who failed to bear a child for the commander and his wife, risked her life to offer hope in the form of words that Offred couldn’t even translate. This small carving of words, hidden in the closet, reignited the fire of freedom that had been dimmed inside of Offered.

                                            _________________________________________________

Words have the power to transport readers to new places, they can inspire a movement, and bring hope to those who identify with characters they read about or quotes that sing to their heart. This week marks the beginning of Banned Books Week, an annual celebration that recognizes  Students’ Right to Read and emphasizes the First Amendment. The theme for this upcoming Banned Books Week (Sept. 24 – Sept. 30) is “Words Have Power. Read a Banned Book.” The words in these banned and challenged books have the power to connect readers to literary communities and offer diverse perspectives. And when these books are threatened with removal from communal shelves, your words have the power to challenge censorship. (ALA)

The Right to Read implies that individuals have the choice in what they read and the ability to be selective in this endeavor. The same freedoms are extended to the group as well and oppose the individual’s efforts to limit what others read. “The right of any individual not just to read but to read whatever he or she wants to read is basic to a democratic society,” (NCTE). Censorship and the banning of books limit the access of information for students. It distorts their understanding of information, creates bias, and neglects to provide a whole picture of the successes and challenges of a community or culture.

In this age of information and with the access to content at the touch of a button, it is essential to develop critical thinking skills and savvy discerners of information instead of limiting what students read. Just as important is the classroom discussion around censorship, along with individual dives into inquiry around bias, banned books, and healthy skepticism.

During Banned Books Week,  I urge you to take part in the activities or create one of your own. In my classroom, I had students select a commonly banned or challenged book, preferably one they were familiar with, and answer the following questions:

  • Why is this book banned or frequently challenged?
  • What passages, lines, words, or characters are often attributed to the challenging or banning of the book?
  • What are the different opinions about this book?
  • What is your opinion?
  • Should this book be banned? Should any book be censored or banned?
  • How does censorship play a role in your life?

This short exercise made students aware of the issue, the sides, take a stand, and defend their thoughts. It provided us a perfect launch into Huck Finn (another frequently challenged book), as well as a larger, conceptual lens on censorship and the Right to Read.

Literacy = Power, Opportunities, Democracy, and Improved Professional & Personal Lives. And although contemporary books and movies, such as The Handmaid’s Tale, paint an extreme cautionary example of censorship and banning books, it does illustrate the importance of freedom and the role literacy plays in our lives.

***And if you are wondering the translation of the Latin words Offred found hidden in her closet, here it is: “Don’t let the Bastards grind you down”… fitting, don’t you think?

Developing “Healthy Skeptics” in the Age of New Literacies

DevelopingHealthy Skeptics in the Digital Age.One of my most poignant “slaps on the face” in the classroom came while conferring with a student over their research paper. During our conversation, confusion arose from the conflicting information that he had found on the web. Upon further dialogue, I learned he relied heavily upon the source, Martin Luther King.org , which was supported by StormFront, a white supremacy group. The information that he found here was in stark contrast to many of the other sources he was citing. This insight hit my like a ton of bricks. I had done very little in terms of supporting students in the areas of discerning information, locating reliable and relevant sources, from learning abilities to the care of their body, with the help of supplements from sites as Reportshealthcare.com.

Technology has launched education into an exciting time in terms of literacy and instruction. These opportunities not only provide rich content, connections to a global learning lab, and creation modes unimagined; but also the exciting challenges to equip our young people with the skills and strategies to not only be creators to the sea of information but also “healthy skeptics” during consumption. This new era of information can bring a lot of benefits into young people, they are able to go online to find many useful things as information for their studies or supplements as this heart attack defender to keep good health.

Proficiency in these constantly evolving literacies will help to “define student success” in both their personal and public lives. Read, writing, communicating and learning in this digital arena is now commonplace instead of a rarity and we must, as educators, lead the charge in educating our youth instead of running away from the lion!

A foundation in multimodality in online media should be included across disciplines and grades. In fact, the Common Core mentions the introduction to digital text as early as Kindergarten. By the upper grades, students in a CCSS aligned district will analyze, synthesize and evaluate digital information, as well as using digital means in their own projects, writings, and multimodal communication.

Support on where to begin and how to build their own knowledge in New Literacies baffles educators. Here is a collection of my favorite resources to support educators and students!

Google Inside Search  – Understand how Google Search works, explore the interactive timeline highlighting the advancement of Google Search throughout the years, and view lesson plans for educators.

BrainPop – A video introduces students to search engines and how to use keywords and phrases to locate the information they want. This site also includes lesson plans which include multi-media ideas and also skills to promote with students for online research!

ReadWriteThink – A great lesson plan to help students focus their internet searching. This lesson not only supports skills need in the initial search, but also reading strategies to locate and evaluate information once it is found!