G-Suite to Support Student Writing, Google Teacher Tribe Podcast

Day 3 Digital Storytelling

When I got the inquiry to record a podcast with my friends Kasey Bell and Matt Miller on their weekly Google Teacher Tribe show I jumped at the chance to talk about the many options to support student writing using GSuite. I met Kasey and Matt at the Austin Google Teacher Academy (now called Google Innovator) and am a huge fan of their work to support teachers and students at a global level.

I have recently seen a reemergence of podcasts as a way to connect and share information and stories and was honored to be part of their “Tribe”. Listen to Podcast 13 where I share information on student writing and how Google can support the process and be sure to subscribe to their podcast for more Googley Information.

Shaelynn’s List of Google Resources, Apps, Add-Ons, and Extensions to Support Writing

Brainstorm Drafting/Writing Revising/Editing Publishing
Draw

Mindmup

Mindmeister

Coggle

Brainstorming Race

Google Scholar

Google Books

Google Save

GSuite

Explore in Docs

Translate

Voice Typing

Google Similar Pages

 

 

 

Keep

Highlighting Tool

Grammarly

Read & Write

Bitmojis

Text Help Study Skills

 

 

Any GSuite

Blogger

YouTube

Google Sites

 

 

 

 

Assessment/Feedback Apps/Exts./Add-Ons Citations Copyright-free Images
Joe Zoo Express

Orange Slice

Kaizena

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Tab

Google Similar Pages

Grammarly

Google Save

Screencastify

First Draft News Check

Hypothesis

Hemingway App

Storyboard That

Soundtrap

Book Creator (Coming Soon)

Powtoon

Sketchboard

EasyBib

Cite This for Me

Apogee

Wayback Machine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Noun Project

Pixaby

Unsplash 

Realistic Shots

Life of Pix 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let me know if you have others to add to my list and be sure to check back soon as I am releasing a book in the fall that will support all your literacy needs through an EdTech Redesign! Sign up on this Google Form to be notified when my book is out!

Posted in #edchat, #teachwriting, Chrome Extensions, Collaboration, communication, Digital Literacies, edchat, Google, Google Teacher academy, Infographics, Literacy, Media literacy, Multiliteracies, Skills, Strategies, Student, students, Teacher, teachers, Technology, writing, YouTube | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Contemporary Literacy Practices, Go Where Your Students Are…

-Want to increase student achievement in reading and writing- Capitalize on the skills they use in their digital world.Education is slow to change. Before something is implemented it must be checked, researched, and statistically proven to impact student achievement before implementation occurs. While I  recognize the value of this system, it is the one that leaves professionals stagnant and places kids at a disadvantage. It also discounts the “gut-instinct” that teachers have when they recognize something is not working for their student and they need to change instruction.

The other day I was problem-solving with a building literacy coach at the middle school level. She spoke about a student, Allena (we will call her), an 8th grader who was classified as a struggling reader and writer by her teachers. The teachers wanted support in the form of strategies or programs that would help fix this child. A silver-bullet to implement that would magically make this student love writing.

In fact, the building literacy coach told me, all she cares about is watching YouTube and making videos for her own channel.

I paused, remembering a James Britton quote, “Go to where your students are – don’t make them come to you.” If you want to increase student reading and writing, go to where your students are in their “literary” worlds. Capitalize on the digital reading and writing that they do every day.

My question to the coach was How can we utilize YouTube to support this struggling writer? How can moviemaking and YouTube Stars be the vehicle in which she learns, practices, and demonstrates literacy skills? Could this entry-point then transfer to other areas of reading and writing?
Literacy is social, constantly changing, and impacted by the practices of a particular group. Contemporary literacy is multimodal, dynamic, and global. For students to be active participants in a global society it is essential to support student creation and consumption of 21st Century Literacies, even if it is driven by gut-instinct and has not had enough time to be deemed “research-approved.” Meeting students where they are does not only mean recognizing what skills they get and what they don’t, it also includes their interests, passions, and quite possibly YouTube.

Posted in #MakeLitREAL, #teachwriting, beliefs, communication, cross-discipline, Curriculum, Digital Literacies, edchat, Literacy, Multiliteracies, reading, Skills, storytelling, Strategies, Student, Teacher, Teacher Beliefs, technoliteracies, Technology, writing, YouTube | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

7 Alternatives to Traditional Vocabulary Tests

6 (1)

It is through vocabulary that information is accessed and content learned. There is no disagreement in the importance of a robust vocabulary for all students; it allows them to comprehend more of what they read and write better. But the way we review and test vocabulary is often very painful, and it doesn’t have to be. So toss aside your fill-in-the-blank tests and multiple choice bubble sheets and try one of these out before the end of the year.

 

7 Alternatives to the Traditional Vocabulary Test

  1. Name That Vocab. Tune – Students love music, in fact, I bet most kids under 18 have earbuds in right now and are jamming out to their favorite tunes as they are studying. Why not amplify this love of music on a vocabulary review or assessment. “Name That Vocab. Tune” has students create a catchy title for a song using the word given. To further demonstrate understanding, students explain and justify their song title and how the vocabulary word fits their thinking.

 

Word Song Title Justification
Juxtapose Black Juxtaposition of Our Hearts When you really love someone and they have no interest in you at all then your heart would be red but their heart would be black and by placing them side by side …

 

2. Sketch Vocabulary – Sketch vocabulary is an activity that allows students to use their creative side to illustrate the meaning of vocabulary words. This strategy can be both low-tech with paper, pencils, and markers; or high-tech using apps like Procreate , Paper 53 , or even the new drawing function with Google Keep (perfect for Chromebooks).

Screenshot 2017-03-30 at 7.23.51 PM

3. SAN – SANs strategy has students identify a word that is the synonym, the antonym or no relation at all to the vocabulary term listed. It not only forces their brain to think of the word differently but also increases their vocabulary by flooding their brain with different options.

Example   Disruptive

  • Clumsy (N)
  • Calm (A)
  • Troublesome (S)

4. How Does it Relate? – This strategy has students call upon prior learning during the test. Have students list and make associations to previous words learned and listed on the word wall in the classroom. Answering the prompt, what is the connection?, further demands deep thinking while students are wrestling with essential vocabulary.

5. Skit or Dialogue – Using the vocabulary words, students can write a short skit or lines of dialogue individually or with a partner or small group. When finished, perform their scripts to each other or a wider audience. Or take their writing online and have them create comics. A few of my favorite resources to explore, Storyboard That (Chromebook) and BookCreator.

Screenshot 2017-03-30 at 7.40.37 PM.png

6. 1 of 2 – This strategy has the students considering 2 sentences and identify which one uses the vocabulary word correctly. This is great when working on words with multiple meanings or focusing on a specific morpheme.

7. Tableau – Finally, a tableau is a group of models or motionless figures that represent a scene. In this case, students are given a vocabulary word and have 3 minutes to brainstorm their tableau that demonstrates the meaning of the word for the class. This fun activity has students collaborating and up and moving.  

 

Edtech Bonus for Vocabulary:

Quizlet

Worducate

Spell It

Spell Up

Posted in #edchat, beliefs, edchat, Student, teachers, teaching, technoliteracies, Technology, vocabulary | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Urban Legends, Headline Hooks, and Ideation: 3 Edtech Writing Activities for Inquiry

Adobe Spark (9)Writing is often short-changed in most classrooms but it is through writing that students demonstrate their understanding of texts, concepts, and topics. Writing about their learning provides insight into what a student understands and where the gaps occurred. For example, I assign a chapter in The Giver for my students to read and the next day in class I kick off the discussion by having students take five minutes to write down everything they know about a Utopian Society, how it has impacted the characters and the setting of the novel. This 5 minute activity provides me with data to inform my instruction. It provides a small glimpse into my students’ understanding of the novel and theme.

Writing as a type of assessment is typically what most teachers think of and utilize in their classrooms but there is a second reason to have students write (and write, and write, and write a lot more). Writing allows us to wrestle with ideas, make a mess with our thinking, and sift the top ideas and thoughts we may have not known were in our heads. It is through writing that exploration and inquiry can be launched in the classroom.

3 Edtech Writing Strategies for Inquiry:

Urban LegendsWomen wearing leggings are denied boarding for their flights, the current slime craze has serious health implications for youth, Disney VHS movies with the Black Diamond cases are worth thousands of dollars. Using myths, Urban Legends, and other misinformation is an engaging way to launch kids into exploration. Not only does this type of activity lead to more reading, writing, and investigation; but it also promotes healthy skepticism in the information age.  During this exploration, students work to uncover the truth and also ask themselves how this phenomenon takes place and what catapults these Urban Legends into popularity. Great places to start:

 

 

Why Might This Be? – This strategy is great for brainstorming and ideation. Collect provocative statements from newspapers, magazines, blogs, etc. Share each line one at a time while students list possible reasons for each (one minute per headline works well). Students are answering the question “Why Might This Be?” as the list as many possibilities. These lists serve as instigators to launch students into an inquiry or exploration unit where student choice is provided.

 

“Denmark Just Drove Uber Out of The Country”  – Why Might This Be?

 

  • New laws were passed.
  • Accidents caused while using Uber.
  • No money being made by government.
  • Hard to police and hold drivers accountable.
  • Acts of violence caused by riders – or drivers.

 

Headline Hooks – This activity has students reading and writing their way through current NF sources. To start with, students spend 20 mins. or more reading articles that spark their interest. Here is a collection of digital sources to have kids explore! During their reading, students take note of what they want to explore more. This list becomes a plethora of ideas to support inquiry throughout the year. Use a graphic organizer once the student has chosen a Headline that Hooked them listing the topic on the top, what they know about it, what they think they will find out, and then what they did find out.

Resources – Kelly Gallagher, Write Like This

Posted in #edchat, #teachwriting, #whyIWrite, Assessment, beliefs, Blogging, Digital Literacies, edchat, students, Teacher | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

5 Videos to Cultivate Empathy in Students

 

sunday market.png

This blog post is part of the CM Rubin World Global Search for Education which poses a question each month to leading educators for reflection and sharing. This month’s question is “how do we cultivate empathy in our students? What role do educators play in creating kind and compassionate students?”

 

Shortly after Christmas, a new student registered and was placed in my freshmen English class. He was quiet, spoke broken English, and wore the face of a person twice his age. Burim, along with his mother and sister, fled the war-torn Bosnia in search of a better place to live. One without bombs, death, and violence; and he, fortunately for all of us, ended up in small-town Iowa. His classmates had no insight into the life that Burim has called normal for the past fifteen years. They woke up in peaceful homes with food on the table before they left in their new car to travel the 5 miles to school. As a teacher, I struggled to find the best way for classroom relationships to form between the refugee and the midwestern students. I didn’t want them to have sympathy for Burim, feeling bad that he witnessed his brother killed before his eyes, avoiding bullets and bombs as he protected his mother at a young age; instead, I wanted the students to have empathy for our new classmate. I wanted them to feel WITH Burim.

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“I want students who are not only best in the world, but best FOR the world,” (Erin Olson). The average person spends around 15% of their life in school from grades K-12, that’s about 12 years of teachers, classrooms, learning, and tests. But school is far more than content, learning involves the development of the whole child and as teachers are charged with a hefty task when you consider the quote above. Not only are we charged with educating kids in the areas of literacy, math, and science; but also developing the EQ skills needed to create productive adults and compassionate citizens.

As a literacy teacher, I cultivated compassion in the classroom, for Burim and others, through reading and writing. Storytelling allows students to socially construct feelings and emotions that allow us to feel WITH a person (empathy) not just for a person (sympathy). Empathy and storytelling transport us to another person’s reality, allows us to understand their perspective, and recognize and communicate these emotions. There are endless lists of books for all ages that educators can use in the classroom to cultivate empathy (Great one from Common Sense found here). Technology also affords us a digital form of storytelling through images and video.

Media Literacy has provided new modes for students to construct an understanding of emotions and experiences from people far different from themselves. This ultra-connected age we are living in brings opportunity to foster empathy not only for those close to us but on a global level. Combining the elements of visual, audio, design, images and video are powerful ways for students to empathize with others. It sparks discussion and action. As educators, we can utilize media as a way cultivate the whole child and foster compassionate and empathetic citizens of the world!

 

5 Videos that Foster Empathy

 

 

 

 

 

(This one was created by former students of mine, moved by empathy, wanting to make a difference)

Finally, 16 interactive images which show the realities of children. (Click on the background of each photo)

Screenshot 2017-03-18 at 8.32.54 AM

Cultivating empathy is part of an educator’s job. There is no test to measure progress or a set curriculum to determine what is taught. Instead, empathy is fostered through modeling, discussions, reading, writing, and creating. And like most things that aren’t measurable on a standardized test, empathy is more important in life and directly impacts the society in which we live!

I love when people share additional resources with me! Here are more videos to consider

Posted in #edchat, beliefs, CM Rubin World, Digital Literacies, edchat, Gratitude, Literacy, Media literacy, Multiliteracies, multimedia, Skills, storytelling, Student, Teacher | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment