Learning Centers in a Blended Literacy Classroom

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I am excited to share this post which was co-authored with my friend, Steven Anderson @web20classroom. It is sponsored by ThinkCERCA, an online platform designed to empower teachers to personalize literacy instruction across disciplines.

There has been no greater impact on differentiation and student achievement in recent years than the effective integration of technology in the classroom. Traditionally, literacy educators spent long hours gathering resources, developing tasks and extensions, and reading and analyzing assessment to determine if the instruction was meeting the needs of students. Now imagine doing this same routine 3 or 4 times over to cover all Lexile levels in one classroom; exhausting. Technology has not only provided text access at students’ differing instructional levels, but has streamlined formative assessment, and has given back precious time to teachers to work with small groups and individuals.

The most effective blended learning model that literacy classrooms can utilize to meet the needs of all readers is the “Rotation Model” in which online engagement is embedded within a range of face-to-face forms of instruction. While this blended environment could look many different ways, we believe that the workshop framework provides the instructional vehicle that makes differentiation most successful. Technology or a blended model is not a component of the workshop framework, but utilized by a skilled workshop teacher, platforms such a ThinkCERCA, and an understanding of each student as a reader is when achievement is maximized.

In a workshop framework, there are 3 main components: Mini-lesson, Independent Practice, and the Share. The mini-lesson is whole group instruction. The teacher targets a learning objective, models it with a mentor text, actively engages the students in similar work, and then sends them on their way to apply the new learning to their own independent books. It is during the independent time that teachers experience the greatest challenges as well as the largest gains made by their young readers in the form of conferring. At the end of the time, the whole class is once again gathered to partner share or large group share out the important work they did during the day.

The question we often receive is centered around the Independent Practice. Teachers witness the benefits of small group instruction but are less certain about the learning taking place by the rest of the class. While there are many different ways to implement and manage independent routines, it is here where technology can best support young readers. During the independent time, centers are one way to keep students learning, not just completing busy work. Literacy Centers, infused with a blended environment is an example of rotation model at it’s best.

Centers –

  1. Student-centered, active inquiry, open-ended
  2. Purpose is to learn, offering opportunities for a variety of levels
  3. Center should be applicable to what you are teaching and what students are learning
  4. Established routines, organized materials, and dedicated space
Centers for the Early Grades Centers for the Intermediate Grades
Independent Reading

***accessible text at independent reading level, epubs, books and articles online

Independent Reading with Reader’s Notebook

***accessible text at independent reading level, epubs, books and articles online, digital reader’s notebook

Listening Center

***tablets, laptops, ipads, ipods

Multimodal Center

***devices and examples on one topic in multiple modes, consumption, and creation

Word Work

***active, and able to manipulate like a drag and drop option, text to speech, videos, word games

Beautiful Lines, Interesting Words, Author’s Craft

***accessible poems online, apps, resources, tools, publishing and sharing platforms

Writing Center

***comprehension checks, graphic organizers, student-created graphic organizers, video and audio, publishing and sharing platforms

Writing Center

***comprehension checks, graphic organizers, student-created graphic organizers, blogs, video and audio, publishing and sharing platforms

Wonder Center

***Virtual Reality, Videos, Infographics

Wonder Center

***Virtual Reality, Videos, Infographics

Poetry Center

***accessible poems online, apps, resources, tools, publishing and sharing platforms

Book Clubs, Literature Discussions

***accessible text, discussion forums, real-time chats and video options

Partner Center

***accessible text, audio and video

Drama Center (Reader’s Theater, plays, speeches)

***accessible material, video examples, clips, video and audio recording capabilities, publishing and sharing platforms

*** Technology Integration Ideas to Consider

Managing independent time in the literacy classroom is an area that teachers must address directly. Independent time, centers, or stations should not be busy work or only used sporadically. It does not have to be an either/or in regards to technology, instead, it is BOTH and supports students with all types of reading and writing they will consume and create in their lifetime.  It is a time for students to take ownership in their own learning. Integrating technology into independent time routines or centers is advantageous for both students and teachers and help to move all readers forward.

Want to learn more? Check out the Administrator Guide to Personalizing Literacy Through Blended Learning from ThinkCERCA! There is also a great webinar on crafting Scalable Blended Literacy Programs worth a watch as well.

References:

Blended Learning Models (Friesen, 2012)

Guided Reading, Fountas & Pinnell

Shaelynn Farnsworth is a Digital Literacy Expert in the Iowa. You can follow her on Twitter @shfarnsworth

Steven W. Anderson is a Digital Teaching and Relationship Evangelist. You can follow him on Twitter @web20classroom.

 

Beginning of the Year Laptop Expectations for the Classroom

 

Laptop Expectations for the Classroom.pngAugust signals the return to school for students and educators across the country. The beginning of the year is often filled with reconnecting with friends, building communities in the classroom, and handing out textbooks. But in some schools, students will not only receive textbooks but a new laptop or tablet to support their learning. Maximizing educational use of technology in the classroom is easier said than done. As educators, we want students to not only consume information but also create awesomeness to share with the world. What is frequently forgotten is the proper care and maintenance that accompanies student devices.

Technology is not a silver bullet for student engagement or classroom management. In fact, devices in the hands of all students amplify good teaching and magnify bad teaching. I recommend having a discussion, early in the year, on the proper care and use of student technology in the classroom. These expectations can be individual to each teacher, constructed and agreed upon as a staff or PLC, or co-constructed with the students; whichever way works best in your educational ecosystem.

In my own classroom, I learned the hard way. When my district implemented 1 to 1 in 2009 I just thought students would appreciate the opportunity of ubiquitous technology in the possession and use it with care. Around December, I realized I needed to rethink my initial thoughts and discuss with the students’ expectations of use. Together, we co-created a list that I have used and shared ever since. Feel free to use and adapt to make your own!

  1. Be Prepared – Just like you would bring your writing tool and book to class every day, you must now bring your new tool (laptop) to class each day. Make sure it is fully charged and ready to go. Although we will not use the laptop every day, we will use it frequently. If you know the application being used in class, have it already opened or immediately pull it up when you get into a class, this will help save time.
  2. Power Up – If you use photo or video editing apps the battery will be drained quicker than just typing. Same is true for streaming video or using skype. Dimming the brightness will help to preserve the battery life. Make sure to set your power display to show the percentage, this will give you a more accurate reading. When the percent reaches 5 or lower, plug in your charger to one of the designated places in the room.  Be sure to use your own charger and take it with you when done.
  3. Screens Down – Anytime I (or a classmate) am speaking, screens will be tilted down.  Nothing is more distracting to you or to others around you than someone surfing the web.  Putting the screen down will help bring attention to the task at hand.
  4. Tech-Tips – I suggest that you have a google doc/folder, document, sticky, etc. to curate skills and tips that you will learn throughout the year in all of your classes. You could also include all handouts and tutorials you receive in a specific folder. Curate videos on your YouTube Channel, or create a spreadsheet of shortcuts to remember. This reference will be useful when maximizing all programs available on your new laptop.
  5. Hands Off – If it’s not yours, keep your hands off! This is for any type of contact with another person’s laptop. When demonstrating to someone, make them manipulate the cursor. If you are the one moving the cursor on their computer they miss the hand/brain connection and will be less likely to remember what you demonstrated.
  6. Sound – All laptops will be muted unless permission is granted.  Bring headphones to listen to needed information during work time.  
  7. Camera Use – Your laptop is equipped with both a digital camera and digital video recorder.  With these tools, we will create a multitude of projects from footage and photos you take. There are expectations that the photos and videos taken are appropriate and in good taste. The subject should always be asked before an image is taken of them. Privileges of these two tools will be revoked if used inappropriately. Please refrain from taping video and snapping pictures of people without permission.
  8. Self-Management – If it is not related to the task assigned, you should not be doing it during class.  This includes email, Googling, etc. Self-Management of digital access is a lifelong skill that relates to productivity. You will not always have your mom standing behind you to stay on task, finish your homework, or complete the work assignment. Use your time wisely, take breaks when needed, and save the memes for your free time.
  9.  Power Teams – Everyone will be at different levels of expertise when using the new technology. This classroom will be one of support and understanding.  Use your peers as resources, help each other, and don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Tips – Location at school should be “in school” and location at home is “out of school.”  If things start acting weird on the computer, the first thing to do is restart it to see if the problem is corrected. Update when prompted to keep systems running smoothly. Double-check to see if you are signed into the correct Google Account.  
  10. Saving – You should be saving your work periodically.  Save each draft as new with a new date.  Save in the appropriate class folder to keep life and work organized.  If you would cry if something was lost, make sure to back up in other places. (gdrive, dropbox, flashdrive, etc.)Plus, if you utilize GSuite, then it is automatically saved without any action on your part.
  11. Transporting – Each time you leave a room make sure your computer is in its bag!  No exceptions! Zip bags. Do not put too much in the front pocket of your bag – it can ruin the disk drive if smashed. Be aware of the weather, do not leave in a vehicle. If you do, allow the computer to reach room temperature before turning on.

This discussion of expectations in the classroom often led to better care of the devices. It also created a platform to then dive into Digital Citizenship, Netiquette, and Copyright. While there were still broken screens throughout the year, having this discussion with students helped to create an environment that supported learning, responsibility, and respect.

7 Virtues of a Blended Learning Teacher

Adobe Spark (17)This blog post is part of the CM Rubin World Global Search for Education which poses a question each month to leading educators for reflection and sharing. This month’s question is To what extent is this a new model of learning in a digital age? Is blended learning becoming yet another overhyped myth?  What lessons learned can you share from your own school community?”

Blended learning is a disputed term among academics and one may find what it is NOT, rather than what it IS. With the changing landscape of education and more technology in the classroom, educators are (consciously or unconsciously) employing this type of learning. In 2009, I entered the world of blended learning after the school I taught at implemented a 1 to 1 laptop initiative which placed computers in the hands of all students (grade 6-12) that they used in the classroom and brought home with them each night. Because of this experience and through conversations I have had with other educators in similar education ecosystems, I believe that blended learning is a combination of traditional teaching methods and digital ones. Blended Learning combines the best of both worlds and allows student control over time, place, pace, and/or path.

Educators who are sound in content and pedagogy are often high-impact blended learning teachers as well. Through reflection and conversation, blended learning teachers possess similar virtues:

Teacher Virtues:  

  1. Uninhibited Creativity in delivery and content of learning
  2. Sees Failure as Opportunities for Growth and gains achieved through perseverance
  3. Seeks out Opportunities for Improvement
  4. Reflective in Practice and on student achievement
  5. Student-centered and Relinquishes Control of elements in traditional teaching
  6. Sees Technological Differentiation as a Way to Meet All Students’ Needs
  7. Recognizes Multidimensional and Multimodal Learning as Relevant and Engaging

 

Teacher virtues in both a traditional or blended environment extend across both and most, are interchangeable in either environment. Technology or blended learning does not automatically make one better. In fact, through experience, it does quite the opposite, magnifying poor classroom management or lack of understanding of content or pedagogy. Effective blended teachers are always effective classroom teachers but the opposite may not be true. To be a high-impact blended teacher it takes creativity, understanding, resourcefulness, and reflection in a digital learning space.

3 Essentials for Success in a Blended [Literacy] Classroom

Adobe Spark (13) (1)This post is sponsored by ThinkCERCA, an online platform designed to empower teachers to personalize literacy instruction across disciplines.

The use of digital learning spaces has exploded in use in classrooms nearly everywhere. Through Learning Management Systems (LMS) many educators are moving to put content online and extend learning beyond the four walls and beyond the school day. This Blended Learning approach is both beneficial but its definition can be tough to nail down. Blended Learning is different than merely integrating technology into the classroom. It provides all learners the ability and opportunity to contribute both openly and differently than they would in a traditional classroom. Simply putting a lecture online and calling it blended learning doesn’t cut it. Students need opportunities for collaborating with peers, creating new ideas, and formatively assessing their knowledge, all taking place in the digital environment.

When done correctly, any classroom can benefit from the blended approach, literacy classrooms especially. Literacy learning is unique in that there are both concrete and abstract concepts that work well in face-to-face teaching and in the digital space. We believe there are 3 essentials for success in any blended literacy classroom.

 

  1. Maximizing Physical and Digital Space – In a blended literacy classroom, success is partly attributed to identifying the “best” practices in both the traditional classroom and a digital space and blending them together. Whole class literacy instruction is best-done face to face. From the modeling of the teaching point to the scaffolding of the active engagement, a physical space in which students can gather and learn is preferred. Co-constructing anchor charts and a quick formative assessment during the active engagement provides educators timely information in which to inform instruction. On the other hand, enrichments for learning, differentiated content, and substantive conversations to construct knowledge may be best in a digital space in which the teacher can support student needs on a larger scale and students can personalize learning anytime and anyplace.  When one considers student needs in both a physical and digital space the list looks similar:

 

Instructional Practices Physical Space Digital Space
Whole Class Purpose: Gathering area to learn and share as a whole class, direct instruction

What it Looks Like: A carpet or rug, open area to accommodate students, transition or movement of bodies/tables for older students

Purpose: Shared digital space by all classmates and teacher(s)

What it Looks Like: A forum or class-stream where everyone can view, post, and comment. A repository of accessible resources, information, and tools that students can utilize during learning.

Independent Purpose: Student area to work, learn, and create on their own
What it Looks Like: A desk, table or flexible furniture, storage space(see selfstorageprices.org.uk), materials
Purpose: Student area to work, learn, and create independently
What it Looks Like: Individual student logins, profile page or virtual “locker” to store materials, information, creations
Small Group Purpose: Area designated to work as a small group of peers or a teacher working with a small group
What it Looks Like: A table; grouping of desks, chairs, or pillows; flexible for student needs and task intent
Purpose: Area designated to work as a small group of peers or a teacher working with a small group
What it Looks Like: A breakout room, group room, or other “digital space” language that designated a spot for students to work together. It may also include a way to assign and share resources peer to group or teacher to group
One on One Purpose: Area designated for partner work, peer conferencing, or teacher to student conferring
What it Looks Like: Conferring table, flexible seating, teacher moves to student
Purpose: Similar to small group with the addition of private peer to peer feedback, teacher to student feedback, messaging
What it Looks Like: Space used can be similar to a small group. Ability to target and differentiate messages and feedback to an individual or privately. Private assessment and gradebook
  1.  Fostering Collaboration and Communication – Although most of our students do not know the world without the internet, collaboration and communication in a digital space does not come naturally to them. In a blended literacy classroom, students are sharing their writing, participating in literature circles, creating multimedia projects in small groups, and providing feedback to each other. A blended environment asks educators to not only support student learning in content areas, it also requires special consideration on how best to grow and support students in a healthy and safe reading and writing community. These skills are often overlooked but essential for success in a blended literacy classroom. To do so, we must foster digital communication and collaboration skills that will impact not only their current learning but their digital footprint as well. One of the best ways is to co-create and establish norms for the blended literacy classroom. Digital space expectations would include communication, collaboration, sharing, messaging, appropriate use, etc. Here are a few to get you started:
  • Communicate effectively when in a digital space.
    • ALL CAPS = Shouting
    • Know your peers/partner/audience, is text lingo appropriate?
    • 3 before Me – have 3 other people read before you publish
  • Recognize all voices in group and peer to peer spaces.
  • Be careful when using jokes or humor online, it is hard to convey meaning through text alone.
  • When providing feedback to peers address them by name, use the PQP Strategy (Praise, Question, Polish), be specific, and sign your name at the end.  
  • During a class discussion on the forum: Be Engaged, Be Active, Be Reflective

 

  1. Accessible Texts and Materials – Finally, recognizing the capability of differentiating content based on student needs in a blended literacy classroom is an essential component for success. With the access to information and support from platforms like ThinkCERCA, blended learning should not limit student choice to one particular text or resource. In fact, through collaboration with the librarian or media specialists, student choice in what they read should increase exponentially. A digital text that is linked to an LMS (Learning Management System) is not blended learning. Blended learning in a literacy classroom includes multiple texts and information that are high interest and available at all independent reading levels. The Common Core State Standards are end goals that are scaffolded and applicable to any content which is seen in the expert reader. Expert readers apply similar skills no matter what they are reading. These transferable strategies are what we intend to fill our students’ toolboxes with and are done so through text in which they can independently access. And just like the fluidity of student interests, so too is their independent reading level. It can change based on prior knowledge, motivation, or interest. When students have endless access to information and texts everyone wins. Fill your blended literacy space as you would a classroom library; full of books, informational texts, articles, media, and audio at all levels and interests!  

 

These 3 Essentials for Blended [Literacy] Learning help to maximize the digital space to support all young readers and writers. Intentional virtual spaces, scaffolding collaboration and communication, and surrounding students with high-interest, accessible texts promote literacy learning and help to raise student achievement that will last a lifetime.

 

Want to learn more? Check out the Administrator Guide to Personalizing Literacy Through Blended Learning from ThinkCERCA! There is also a great webinar on crafting Scalable Blended Literacy Programs worth a watch as well.

Shaelynn Farnsworth is a Digital Literacy Expert in the Iowa. You can follow her on Twitter @shfarnsworth
Steven W. Anderson is a Digital Teaching and Relationship Evangelist. You can follow him on Twitter @web20classroom.