Public Behavior Charts: Just Say No!

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Grace emerged from the bus last. I could tell from the look on her face that she was upset. She looked in my eyes and immediately broke down, tears streaming down her cheeks and unable to catch her breath through the whimpers. I hugged her with every ounce of love I had in my body. We walked home, she tucked under my arm while I stoically led the way. When we stepped inside the comfort of our home, Grace tearfully gasped, “I was on Red today.”

Public Behavior Charts Hurt Kids

In schools across America, students are adjusting from summer routines to classroom routines. Excitement to see friends and meet their new teachers is overshadowed by the behavior clip-down chart looming at the front of the room. They are constantly reminded that one mistake would catapult their designated clothespin from the top to the bottom, serving as a visible disappointment to every adult and peer in the room.

I am not naïve enough to think that my children never have bad days or make mistakes. In fact, I expect them to have hiccups as they learn to navigate through school. But a public behavior chart has punitive consequences that outlast the offense itself. Ridicule from peers and negative self-thoughts do not belong in our schools in any form.

There are many options educators can use as an alternative to the Public Behavior Chart:

  1. A simple note home or a weekly graph of the same behavior system can be shared privately with parents or slipped into a folder and transported home.
  2. A Google spreadsheet can also replace Public Behavior Charts. Sharing a Google spreadsheet with both the parents and the child keeps the information private, as well as acts as an ongoing update on behavior.
  3. Another alternative, and one of my new favorites, is the “behavior tracking” option found in the Bloomz app. This digital alternative allows teachers to share successes and concerns with parents in a private and secure way. Along with a number of other options, this school-to-home app keeps the lines of communication open without retributions attached to more public options. A private messaging option promotes dialogue between child, parents, and teachers.

Educators work to develop and support the whole child, which includes much more than just scholastics. Behavior, both positive and negative, should be shared with parents but not posted publicly. Using a digital, secure and, most importantly, a private alternative such as Bloomz is what is best for kids. Just Say Yes!

 

About sfarnsworth

Educational Services Consultant: Literacy, Technology, and AIW. Certified Google Innovator. Staff Developer
This entry was posted in #edchat, beliefs, edchat, Education, elementary, Student, students, Teacher Beliefs and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Public Behavior Charts: Just Say No!

  1. Andrew Fenstermaker says:

    Thanks for sharing. I was that teacher for a few years in first grade that used colors for behavior. I then used Class Dojo. When I came across a post by Matt Gomez about his one rule classroom and why he didn’t use behavior charts, I ditched the charts and colors. Classroom management was stressed in college, but it’s more about relationship building and lesson design for student engagement. Great reminder about the negative, lasting impact color charts can have on kids.

    Like

  2. Pingback: Digital Portfolios with Bloomz | Shaelynn Farnsworth

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