Uncovering the Why: the Importance of Beliefs

BeliefsFor many years, my professional learning consisted on the “what” and “how” in the classroom. What were your kids reading? writing? discussing? What tech were you using? How are you using portfolios? How do you grade? How do you differentiate? 

While all of these questions are important to answer, it wasn’t until I drilled down the Why, that I truly appreciated learning. Understanding the why, helps provide a framework in which all other decisions can be based upon. Why do I teach Shakespeare? Why do I have students blog? Why does it matter that students publish to  public audience? Why do I prefer the workshop framework over traditional instruction?

Currently, I am reading Read, Write, Teach by Linda Rief. The introduction provides insight into the purpose, design, and the Why for writing this book. She starts with the Why because it “grounds her choices of the what and how.”

The following are images of my own Whys on Literacy, inspired by the work of Linda Rief. I encourage you to not only explore your own beliefs on teaching and learning, but also to bring the conversation back to your departments, buildings, or even districts. Do we have similar beliefs? What is gained and what is lost when staff members have the same beliefs? Is a common set of shared beliefs necessary for our students?

Read, Write, Teach- Rief (1).jpg

Read, Write, Teach- Rief (2).jpg

 

 

 

 

About sfarnsworth

Educational Services Consultant: Literacy, Technology, and AIW. Certified Google Innovator. Staff Developer
This entry was posted in #iaedchat, #tcrwp, #teachwriting, beliefs, communication, edchat, Education, goals, Iowa, Literacy, Multiliteracies, Teacher Beliefs, Uncategorized, Workshop, writing, Writing Workshop and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Uncovering the Why: the Importance of Beliefs

  1. Hey Shaelynn. I appreciate your thoughts and agree the “why” is important!
    In my experiences working with adults, it has been especially important to be clear on the “why” prior to or at the same time as the “what” and “how.” A potential challenge I see is working alongside adults when we do not share a similar set of beliefs. What are some ways groups of people who do not share beliefs might effectively coexist?

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