7 Characteristics to Look For when Purchasing New Curriculum/Programs

2

It’s that time of the year again when schools across the country are looking to purchase new curriculum and programs. Often times the big rocks that make things best for kids are masked by bells and whistles. Part of my role is helping educators determine which programs and curriculum are right for their staff and students. I believe that no one program or curriculum meets all standards or needs of all students, but there are definite factors that schools should consider before purchases are made.

7 Characteristics to Look For when Purchasing New Curriculum/Programs

  1. Direction – Before making a purchase of new curriculum it is important to understand the mission and goals of the program. After an introduction to the program, educators should have a clear understanding of the direction the program intends to deliver as well as the means in which to arrive. Look for both a larger conceptual mission of the curriculum that reach both inside and outside of the school as well as smaller goals aligned with the mission.
  2. Standards – All teachers follow some sort of standards or guide in which to embed curriculum and write student learning targets. Whether you are using the Common Core State Standards or a different roadmap to guide instruction be sure that there is alignment between the two. I again want to reiterate that while no program or curriculum materials reach all Standards or student needs, there are definite discrepancies between the quality available from each company.
  3. Learning Cycles – Within each program or set of curriculum materials, there should be evidence of learning cycles. Look for assessment in both pre and post formats, objectives, steps, scaffolds, timelines, etc. When purchasing programs that are meant to meet the needs of students all of these factors come into play during instruction and learning.
  4. Resources – When identifying which programs or curriculum to purchase it is essential to consider the resources included (or not included) for successful implementation. Resources involve materials for both teachers and students, people and time, technology integration, and also alternatives. Having to create or find material, people, and time that was not expected at the initial time of purchase can be detrimental to any new program or curriculum.
  5. Professional Learning – Knowing what professional learning is available for programs and curriculum schools are considering purchasing helps plan for roll-out, implementation, as well as systemic change. Professional learning could come in a variety of forms from on-site training, manuals, digital resources, and communities. While purchasing high-quality materials is an investment in kids, a better investment is in the educators that are working with students. Do not neglect this area when making a purchase. What typically happens is spotty use and frustrated staff members.
  6. Student-Centered – When purchasing new curriculums or programs it is important to always keep the student at the center of your decision. Students should recognize themselves (backgrounds, ethnicities, genders, etc.) in the texts. Materials targeted to engage youth at appropriate ages. Subjects that are important and relevant to students. Does the material allow for choice in content or demonstration of understanding? Is there a variety of instructional styles designed to meet more than one “type” or student needs.
  7. Continuous Improvement – Finally, it is also important to identify resources within programs and curriculum that allow for interventions, spiral or scaffolded learning, enrichment activities, and multi-lingual support for our EL students. Do they value reflection and metacognition empowering students to own their learning?  Are there clear ways information and data collected informs instruction and supports educators enhance learning for ALL students in their classroom?

(Adapted from David W. Moore)

I also like to gauge the group whose charge it is to identify and select programs/curriculum to purchase. I use this form and share the results with the school leadership team so that all voices are heard. Feel free to make your own copy to use.

screenshot-2017-02-24-at-1-53-48-pm

Posted in #edchat, administration, Assessment, beliefs, Consultant, Curriculum, edchat, Education, Instructional Coaching, Program, students, Teacher | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fake News Should Die… Or Should It?

halden

This blog post is part of the CM Rubin World Global Search for Education which poses a question each month to leading educators for reflection and sharing. This month’s question is “how do we fight the fake news epidemic?”

 

Recently, Fake News has been getting a bad reputation, I’m hoping this post changes that!

Over half of Americans get their news from just one social media site – Facebook and 45% of US adults say government politicians and elected officials bear a great deal of responsibility for preventing made-up stories from gaining attention (Pew Research Center,  December 15, 2016). These statistics alarm me. Not the first one highlighting where people find information, but the second claim in which many feel the responsibility of identifying and stopping the spread of fake information resides with the government.

It is essential for educators to develop healthy skepticism within each child; critical discerners of information that are able to evaluate, analyze, and apply information that they encounter throughout their lifetime, no matter the mode.

Information is doubling every 12 days, containing fake news, half-truths, alternate facts, and reliable information; and while there are many resources (my list here) and blog posts written that offer apps, website, fact-checkers, and lessons plans for educators to utilize, we must not overlook the charge of education in our pursuit of combating fake news –  to develop independent, critical thinkers.

_________________________________________________________________

A conversation I had with my 7th grade son and his friends this morning:

Me: What do you know about fake news?

Son: What do you mean?

Son’s friend: Didn’t you see President Trump on the news yesterday talking about news sources…

After a brief discussion on politics

Me: So what should we do with people or news sources that report and spread fake news?

Son: Fine them, make them pay…

Son’s friend: They should get jail time.

All the boys: Yes, jail time and not be allowed to report fake news. The government needs to shut those people down…

Me: So the government should police the internet, news sources, social media, conversations and get rid of all of the fake news?

Deep Thought

Son’s friend: Well that means I could be thrown in jail… or we could end up like North Korea…

BINGO!

_________________________________________________________________

Fake news is not a bad thing. In fact, it provides teachable moments for educators across the globe. It begs us to consider who or what determines information as fake? And How can we support kids in their pursuit of understanding? The discernment of information and the application to construct one’s own understanding should be practiced and refined in every classroom across the country. With that being said, the importance of what should be done with fake information and the people or corporations that report this news as truth is a piece of the conversation that is missed.

 

  • What exactly is fake news?
  • Would killing off fake news truly help people?
  • Does allowing others to determine what information you have access to leave you with only factual and correct information?
  • Who should police the internet?
  • What role should the government play in determining access to information?
  • Does killing off fake news equal censorship?
  • Is censorship needed?
  • Can censorship be both good and bad?
  • Can censorship and freedom of speech coexist?

Resources, websites, fact-checkers are nice. They support an individual’s pursuit of knowledge. We use them as adults and we should definitely model and share them with students.

But

DO NOT forget the second part of the conversation, one in which students understand the value of fake news in the age of information. The conversation that includes the tough discussions on freedom of speech, critical thinking, approaching information with healthy skepticism, and censorship.

Special thanks to Shawn McCusker and Steven Anderson for sharing information freely!

Posted in #edchat, #iaedchat, #tcrwp, #teachwriting, beliefs, Citation, classroom discussions, CM Rubin World, Collaboration, communication, edchat, TGTB | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Consider These 6 Areas When There is a Glitch in Reading Comprehension

when-reading-comprehension-breaks-down

Direct instruction in literacy should not end in elementary school. Students of all ages need continual modeling and practice of reading comprehension skills. And while many elementary teachers use running records to inform instruction, at the intermediate grades, this type of assessment can be modified to meet the needs of our older readers.

At the end of the oral reading, students retell what they had just read summarizing, analyzing, and connecting to the text. This retelling is preferred over the typical question-answer assessment for older students. Retelling gives us a glimpse into the reader’s cognition and provides valuable insight as to what was grasped and what may have been lost.

During the reflection with the student following the retell, teachers can hone in on 6 areas to identify possible sources that contribute to the breakdown of comprehension.

6 Areas to Explore when Reading Comprehension Breaks Down

  1. Background Knowledge on the topic. Do I need more information on the topic in order to understand the text? Would rereading or talking about it help me understand new concepts presented by the author?
  2. Vocabulary. Were there lots of words I’ve never heard of or seen in this selection?
  3. Cultural Differences. Is this about a way of thinking or pattern of acting that is different from mine?
  4. Word-Recognition Skills. Can I figure out hard or unfamiliar words?
  5. Comfort with the task. Am I worried about doing well?
  6. Responses to environmental influences inside and outside of school. Am I confident I can be successful?

(Based on the work of Mary Shea)

When teachers and students reflect and identify areas that contribute to the breakdown of comprehension glitches can be addressed efficiently. Teachers instruction is targeted and students understanding of themselves as readers grow enhancing independence and comprehension.

Posted in #edchat, #tcrwp, Assessment, beliefs, communication, edchat, reading, Reading Instruction, Skills, students, Teacher, Teacher Beliefs, teaching | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

6 Practices that “Work” to Accelerate Student Learning

small-group-instruction-reading-and-writing-2

In education, we are often inundated with programs, curriculums, and frameworks that are “guaranteed to increase student learning”. Promises of a silver bullet that will fix all learning difficulties find their way to teachers and administrators alike. But as John Hattie points out in Visible Learning, it’s hard not to show growth or “evidence” for a program when the bar is set at zero.

As I began my study of Visible Learning for Literacy, much of the initial learning was not concentrated on what works in literacy, but what accelerates students’ learning in any classroom. Hattie identifies what works in education based on his research and a hinge point of .40 or greater. (The hinge point is any influence with an effect size of .40 or greater as having a positive impact on learning where acceleration extends beyond what a student can achieve in one year of simply attending school.)

Identifying high-impact influences and practices enhance an educator’s role as they reflect and evaluate their teaching by placing research and evidence in their hands. “What Works” in the classroom shifts from a buzzword to intentional practice that will accelerate learning. While Hattie identifies many influences above .40, I’ve narrowed the list down to 6 that apply to all educators.

6 Practices that “Work” to Accelerate Student Learning

  1. Teacher credibility (.90 effect size) Trust, competence, energy, enthusiasm, and consistency are among the top characteristics students consider when determining if their teacher is credible and if they are going to choose to learn from them.
  2. Teacher-Student Relationships (.72 effect size) Positive teacher-student relationships involve trust, fairness, open communication and maintenance to sustain and impact student learning.  
  3. Classroom Management (.52 effect size) Students understand expectations and are consistently held to those expectations. Promotes healthy relationships with teachers and peers.  
  4. Self-Reported Grades/Student Expectations (1.44 effect size) Students set their own goals, monitor their own achievement, and reflect upon their process of learning.
  5. Teacher Clarity (.75 effect size) Learning targets are clear and articulated with success criteria. Students should be able to answer: What am I learning today? Why am I learning this? How will I know that I learned it?
  6. Feedback (.75 effect size) Just-in-time feedback identifies where the student is at, what the expectation is, and actions they can take to close the gap.

Simply put, be genuine and clear, relationships matter, create a safe environment that nurtures independence, and feedback moves students not grades!

Posted in #edchat, Assessment, beliefs, edchat, Hattie, Visible Thinking | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Technoliteracies: Sharing the Top Digital Resources to Support Student Readers and Writers

technoliteracies

Last year, my best friend Erin Olson and I started an Instagram account to share our love of literacy and technology. Technoloiteracies was born as a place where we could share the best resources, apps, and technology to support student readers and writers.

Instagram is a perfect platform to share resources and connect with other educators. Instagram is an example of microblogging; the sharing of short and frequent posts which made it ideal for us. Erin and I typically share resources a couple times a week. The resources and apps we share span the grades (K-12), cross platforms and devices, and focus on all things literacy. So if you are on Instagram, check us out!

 

Technoliteracies Top 9 Posts of 2016

img_4583

 

  1. Hypothes.isOpen annotation on the web. Hypothes.is allows users to highlight and annotate web pages. Converse over the world’s knowledge and share to public, group, or keep private! Also available as a Chrome extension. Great to support student thinking, research & curation.
  2. Pics4Learning Pics4Learning is a perfect resource to share with students and educators. Here, you will find images to use in all things for school and it’s safe search helps to keep it appropriate for all learners. From multimedia creations to digital portfolios, these copyright-friendly images are perfect and support student understanding in terms of image use and citations. As a bonus, you can also add to the growing collection by uploading your own images to share.
  3. PrismaPrisma is an incredible photo editing app which transforms images into works of art based on the styles of famous artists and periods. Share with students for use in multimedia projects and great for digital storytelling.
  4. 100 Word Challenge – 100 Word Challenge is an online resource which provides a weekly creative writing challenge for kids under 16. Prompts are posted and the community of writers made up of students and educators post and comment on student writing. Anyone can join and share their succinct writing to a global audience. Great to get students writing for real.
  5. Elink.io – Check out elink.io as a perfect tool to collect, curate, & share webpages. Perfect for newsletters sharing student creations or webpages of resources to launch kids into a new unit. Simple, easy, and free. Also available as a chrome extension.
  6. ThingLink – ThingLink provides users with an interactive and engaging platform, great for inquiry. Multiple student and teacher uses by linking and sharing content. Now, ThingLink offers a 360 picture view. Checkout out Thinglink.com for interactive images and videos! Easily create a collection of resources for students.
  7. Bubbl.us – Check out bubbl.us. A brainstorming tool perfect for students to organize thoughts and make their thinking visible. Color code topics, modify and move bubbles with a click, and share with peers for collaborative work.
  8. Dipity – An interactive timeline that has unfortunately shut down. Try TimeToast as an alternative.
  9. Read The World – Readtheworld.org is a site that helps you diversify your literature selections. It is an archived hand-picked book site which is divided by country, region, and state. Each title has a brief summary, quotes, length, and brief author bio.

img_4586

 

Erin and I wish you all a Happy and Healthy 2017!

 

Posted in #edchat, #teachwriting, beliefs, Blogging, Collaboration, Differentiation, Digital Literacies, edchat, Instagram, technoliteracies | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment