Guided Reading Made Simple

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Guided Reading is appropriate for any grade level and is part of a balanced literacy program. Even as adults, we gain skills to understand new or difficult texts (epubs, infographics, poetry, microblogging). Guided reading helps educators differentiate in the classroom and aims to “develop independent readers who question, consider alternatives, & make informed choices.” – Mooney 

By the time students enter the third grade, they have decoding skills and guided reading is used to provide explicit instruction to develop powerful readers. Reading is understanding! And through guided reading students continue to add strategies to their toolbox that will help them understand any difficult text they encounter.

Before starting guided reading:

  1. Establish routines that support independent work and classroom management so small groups can be pulled for instruction.
  2. Identify groups of 5 or 6 students that read at the same instructional level or who have similar strategy needs.
  3. Groups are temporary and dynamic, based on need and should be changed when assessment and behavior dictate.
  4. Older students are less likely to display reading behavior because most processing is done automatically and unconsciously, but they are able to write and talk about their understanding and reading processes better than younger students.

Once groups have been established:

  1. Select text based on the instructional level of readers.
  2. Introduce the text, modeling strategies good readers use to understand what they read.
  3. Students read the whole text or designated portion of a longer piece. This is done independently and silently. During this time, teachers can observe and note reading behaviors, have individual students read a portion orally, work with another small group or conference with individual students.
  4. When the everyone is done reading, students discuss the text with the support of the teacher.
  5. Based on notes or the discussion, the teacher models 1 or 2 strategies students need and then apply to the text.
  6. Two optional guided reading components include an extension activity. Students continue learning through writing activities,  sketchnoting, or even a multimedia response. Word work is another option that could take place after the text is read.

Guided reading is effective and efficient to boost student achievement in the area of reading comprehension.  Often it is met with hesitation, educators are unsure of how it “looks” in the classroom. Following the framework above helps to alleviate those  fears providing structure to a powerful balanced literacy component.

Source: Fountas and Pinnell

 

 

Posted in #edchat, #tcrwp, Differentiation, edchat, elementary, Literacy, multimedia, reading, Skills, Strategies, students, Teacher | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Public Behavior Charts: Just Say No!

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Grace emerged from the bus last. I could tell from the look on her face that she was upset. She looked in my eyes and immediately broke down, tears streaming down her cheeks and unable to catch her breath through the whimpers. I hugged her with every ounce of love I had in my body. We walked home, she tucked under my arm while I stoically led the way. When we stepped inside the comfort of our home, Grace tearfully gasped, “I was on Red today.”

Public Behavior Charts Hurt Kids

In schools across America, students are adjusting from summer routines to classroom routines. Excitement to see friends and meet their new teachers is overshadowed by the behavior clip-down chart looming at the front of the room. They are constantly reminded that one mistake would catapult their designated clothespin from the top to the bottom, serving as a visible disappointment to every adult and peer in the room.

I am not naïve enough to think that my children never have bad days or make mistakes. In fact, I expect them to have hiccups as they learn to navigate through school. But a public behavior chart has punitive consequences that outlast the offense itself. Ridicule from peers and negative self-thoughts do not belong in our schools in any form.

There are many options educators can use as an alternative to the Public Behavior Chart:

  1. A simple note home or a weekly graph of the same behavior system can be shared privately with parents or slipped into a folder and transported home.
  2. A Google spreadsheet can also replace Public Behavior Charts. Sharing a Google spreadsheet with both the parents and the child keeps the information private, as well as acts as an ongoing update on behavior.
  3. Another alternative, and one of my new favorites, is the “behavior tracking” option found in the Bloomz app. This digital alternative allows teachers to share successes and concerns with parents in a private and secure way. Along with a number of other options, this school-to-home app keeps the lines of communication open without retributions attached to more public options. A private messaging option promotes dialogue between child, parents, and teachers.

Educators work to develop and support the whole child, which includes much more than just scholastics. Behavior, both positive and negative, should be shared with parents but not posted publicly. Using a digital, secure and, most importantly, a private alternative such as Bloomz is what is best for kids. Just Say Yes!

 

Posted in #edchat, beliefs, edchat, Education, elementary, Student, students, Teacher Beliefs | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

5 YouTube Tips for the Classroom

Screenshot 2016-09-10 at 3.43.56 PM.pngWith over a billion users, YouTube reaches more 18-34-year-olds than any cable network. In education, YouTube is viewed as a learning tool and also a creation tool with YouTube Editor, Channels, Subscriptions, and even part of students’ digital portfolios. I’d like to share with you 5 of my favorite YouTube Tips for personal and student use.

5 YouTube Tips

1. Create your own gifs from YouTube videos by simply typing the word gif in video url in the address bar. Select a time for start and stop, add text, stickers, and more. Download or embed to share.

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2. Explore Virtual Reality through the 360 degrees videos found on YouTube. Although you can’t interact in the video, you can change view and direction by using the click and drag features. Check out the  Ballet  video or the 360 Degree Channel  for more videos to explore.

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3. Are you ever listening to your favorite Jam and want to play it continuously? Access the loop feature by right clicking on the video or”alt” click on chromebook. No longer will you have to reach for the mouse to replay the video.
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4. Here are a few tips and hidden features to optimize your YouTube channel. Select “Featured Content” for all videos, place a personal “Watermark” on your videos, or identify and add “Keywords” to your channel description for optimal traffic. All of these are great strategies to share with students to amplify their own content and channels!

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5. Finally, want to try out new YouTube features? Scroll down to the bottom of the YouTube page and click on “Try Something New!” TestTube gives you insider information and access to YouTube awesomeness in the works!

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4 Brain-Friendly Practices in a Student-Centered​ Classroom

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Adolescence is a vital time for our students. During the ages of 11 through 18, young people are making habits that last a lifetime. And since many of their waking hours are spent in school, it is important for educators to incorporate brain-friendly practices into their classrooms. These practices, when consistently incorporated, impact the whole child and help to develop habits of mind that will support students throughout their lifetime.

4 Brain-Friendly Practices in a Student-Centered Classroom:

  1. Choice – Provide choice! This simple concept is one that research shows not only increases reading achievement when a child chooses what they read, but also engagement when the choice is theirs to make. Move from teacher-centered to student-centered through choice, for instance, provide choice in content. With a learning objective as a skill in the writing process, student choice can be given in paper content. Or choice can be given in end product; why limit the demonstration of understanding to just text? Multimedia products are a perfect way for students to demonstrate understanding.
  2. Task Design – In a student-centered classroom, brain research can be applied to task design. Chunking information, using graphic organizers or guiding questions, connecting learning experiences to a larger concept are all brain-friendly practices that educators can incorporate while designing lessons or units. Our brain naturally identifies patterns, groups, and organizes items.
  3. Peers – Teaching others is a highly effective, brain-friendly practice and during adolescence, nothing is more important to young people than their peers. When students teach each other it boosts understanding to both partners and is often taught in a different way than a teacher could explain.
  4. Authentic – Brain-friendly practice includes authenticity in learning. Read, write, and create for real purposes instead of doing school for school’s sake. In a student-centered classroom, an example of authentic writing is Blogging. Through blogging, students share their voice with a global audience, a shift from the traditional, lone teacher.

Sources:

Thomas Armstrong

BrainLady

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3 Needs I Have as a Parent-Educator and How Bloomz Can Help

File_000 (5).jpegThis year, around 55 million students are heading back to school and I am the mom of two of them.

Wearing multiple hats as both a mother and an educator can be a difficult job that many in this field experience. The beginning of the school year is a time when I delicately place the care of my children in the hands of a fellow teacher and trust that they will return happy, challenged, and successful. School to home communication is never more important than at the beginning of the school year.

As a parent, I have 3 main needs this communication must answer:

  1. Show me you care!
  2. How is my child doing?
  3.  How can I help?

Effective school to home communication includes utilizing multiple platforms and modes to communicate to the widest possible audience and using technology provides timely, fast, and easy communication options. Recently, I was introduced to Bloomz, a mobile and web app used for communication, and am quickly falling in love with its ease of use and options available to both educators and parents. Bloomz is also a perfect fit to meet the needs I have as a parent. It can easily help keep the lines of communication open between parents and teachers, addressing the needs that we all have.

Screenshot 2016-08-31 at 8.40.16 AMShow me you care!

As a parent, I witness the love of learning in my own children when they have a caring relationship with their teacher. I look to my child’s teacher to guide and support them, not only in the areas of math and reading but also interpersonal skills. Bloomz provides teachers the ability to send messages and share pictures in a safe and self-contained environment. A daily recap message or weekly update, photos from the classroom or of my child reading in the nook all help to promote a transparent classroom, letting parents know that relationships are being built in a caring environment.

Screenshot 2016-08-31 at 8.42.30 AMHow’s is my child doing?

Nothing is more rewarding than receiving recognition on the good your child exhibits. Whether displaying my child’s talent in writing or praising their kindness to a new student, educators can rarely over-communicate with a parent. And just as I want to hear the good, it is important to be informed if my child is struggling with a math concept or isn’t following directions in science class. As school to home communication expert, Steven Anderson told me, “It is better to be proactive rather than reactive.” Again I found this need to know as a parent met with the Bloomz app. First, I could download it on my phone, which alleviates the multiple clicks I must endure trying to locate information on my child on other platforms. It also provides large-group, small-group, and individual messaging so that success can be shared and concerns targeted. Translation into multiple languages is available with Bloomz, as well as a new behavior tracking, which means no more stickers slapped on my child’s shirt or public clip-down charts of shame. 

Screenshot 2016-08-31 at 8.51.48 AMHow can I help?

Finally, as a parent, I want to know what I can do at home to support my child’s learning. What specific needs are there for the classroom? Are there volunteer opportunities for reading days, field trips, etc.? As a parent, I love reading to Grace Ann’s class, volunteering to chaperone Aiden’s field trip, or donating a dessert for conference nights. With Bloomz, teachers can share calendars, send event invites, request, and assign volunteers, and even post reminders.

As the school year begins and my hat shifts between being a parent and being an educator, I am reminded of the importance of a transparent classroom and the communication between school and home that is necessary to support my children as they embark on a new journey. A letter home, a classroom website, or even an app like Bloomz helps qualm those burning needs that many parents have and establishes a positive line of communication.

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